‘Her’

A story about a man who falls in love with the voice inside his computer could’ve been told in a lot of ways. It could’ve been an absurd comedy. Or a psychological thriller. Or a satire about our gadget-obsessed times. Luckily, ‘Her’ is none of those things. It is an extremely poetic tale about our constant struggle to replace loneliness with happiness and our (usually failed) attempts to understand (and eventually love and accept) ourselves by trying to understand, love and accept another person. And much more than that.

Watching ‘Her’ is an incredibly satisfying journey from every perspective: it makes you feel, think and devour its mesmerizing imagery all at the same time. The movie sets off as a clever social commentary (the main character works at a website that provides ‘beautiful handwritten letters to your loved ones’ – a truly unsettling concept) but quickly moves into a much more ambiguous world of human emotions and relationships. The greatest thing about ‘Her’ is that behind the façade of the ironic premise, it really is a typical story of two mismatched lovers: Samantha could’ve easily been a young lady with a fatal disease. Or a blind person. Or a man. But while the idea of lovers struggling to stay together despite of the circumstances is hardly a new one, the main power of ‘Her’ lays in the way the story told. The writing is thoughtful yet accessible: from Amy’s observation that love is ‘a socially acceptable form of insanity’ to Theodor’s confession that being with someone who’s excited about the world does make you feel good. But it’s Samantha and her constant self-discovery that creates the movie’s unique vibe: her journey is fascinating and frightfully familiar. This is a truly remarkable cinematic experience based on one of the most complicated yet believable love stories we’ve seen in the last several years.

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Posted on by Mikey Moscow in Cinema

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